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Bo Xi Xi itibaren Villa Heights, VA, Birleşik Devletler itibaren Villa Heights, VA, Birleşik Devletler

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Bo Xi Xi itibaren Villa Heights, VA, Birleşik Devletler

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I definitely understand why Frankenstein is considered a classic--it has complex themes, great visual descriptions, and poetic language: "The cup of life was poisoned for ever; and although the sun shone upon me as upon the happy and gay of heart, I saw around me nothing but a dense and frightful darkness, penetrated by no light but the glimmer of two eyes that glared upon me." But despite all that, I really didn't care for it. The plot doesn't get going until about halfway through, when we finally meet Frankenstein's monster. Before that, Frankenstein himself mostly whines about how miserable he is and has been (he really does that throughout the book). It's hard to feel sympathy for him or his creation. Frankenstein took no responsibility for his actions until it was too late, and his monster commits crimes against the innocent and says he's sorry only after Frankenstein has died. Granted, sympathy may not be the point of the novel, but in order for me to really enjoy a story, I need at least one character I can identify with, and in Shelley's book I found none. I'm glad I've read it, and it definitely had its high points (I did feel for the monster as he described his first encounter with horrified humans), but I'm also glad it was rather short.