okaywalrus

Caleb Boyles Boyles itibaren Le Cheix, Fransa itibaren Le Cheix, Fransa

Okuyucu Caleb Boyles Boyles itibaren Le Cheix, Fransa

Caleb Boyles Boyles itibaren Le Cheix, Fransa

okaywalrus

Düzensiz, her zaman parlak, bazen ustaca bir şey.

okaywalrus

This is definitely a book that people will either love or hate. It's just that kind of book. Not everyone is going to pick this up and like it. Even the people who end up really liking it, while reading it keep finding themselves putting down the book, looking around the room and sighing in discomfort, wondering if they should really continue. They will though, and they will once again find themselves fully immersed. Jose Saramago writes this specific story in such a way that you are one of the blind people. Punctuation is few and far between, at least when it comes to dialogue. When people are talking to each other, it's just one continuous run on sentence, forcing the reader to try and discern who is talking and what they are talking about. It forces you to be in the same predicament as the blind. The way he writes makes you realize just how much we all do rely on visual stimuli, even in books! Even though our protagonist is one of the few with sight, Saramago often forgoes visual descriptions of objects and places with the way the feel, sound and even smell. For me, it marked Saramago as a truly brilliant writer. But even brilliant writers and brilliant books have their flaws. The time spent in the hospital seemed too long and unneccessary to further the story along, rather it stopped the story. It was that portion of the book I found it most difficult to get through, but in the end I got through it and to their journey out into the real world. It's there that the book picks back up and you find yourself absolutely enthralled. Overall, this book was beautifully written and wonderfully told. An interesting story made even more so with the way Saramago writes it. This is a book I definitely recommend, but I give you a warning, it becomes slightly wordy at times and drags at different times. Give it a chance though, because it does pick back up.

okaywalrus

I'll save my comments for our book club discussion.

okaywalrus

man, does he have any good books other than Gatsby? this hasn't aged well. a sheltered well-to-do toff goes to Princeton... I got to page 85, skimmed to a random page further on, saw the line "I detest poor people" and decided to stop reading. Catcher in the Rye for the indulgent 20s? Maybe, but it's not good reading

okaywalrus

Two same-subject books arrived one day. The books are so alike that I just goofed on which one I read and which I took back to the library. Thayer's book is the one I'll buy and keep. His introduction has a "Claimer" rather than a "Disclaimer" which publishers put in to abrogate responsibility for anyone croaking as a result of eating the wrong thing. Thayer scoffs openly at a publisher that wrote "Neither the authors nor the publishers in any way endorse consumption or other uses of wild plants that are mentioned in this book." What a hoot! Thayer stands by his work, takes responsibility for any erroneous information, which I'll guess means it's all good, researched stuff, and then writes "But, of course, I am not responsible for your mistakes." This book will be on my reference shelf just as soon as I balance my checkbook.