benjamin-biswas

Benjamin Biswas Biswas itibaren Saint-Félix, 73870, Fransa itibaren Saint-Félix, 73870, Fransa

Okuyucu Benjamin Biswas Biswas itibaren Saint-Félix, 73870, Fransa

Benjamin Biswas Biswas itibaren Saint-Félix, 73870, Fransa

benjamin-biswas

This book takes a monumental topic -- the periodic table -- and breaks it down into various digestible topic areas. While I enjoyed it (and learned a lot of history of science trivia I'd been unaware of, what with my head stuck in the 18th century) and had a few "a-ha" moments as some organic chemistry concepts FINALLY made sense to me (14 years after my last ochem class), I have two big problems with the book. -1 star because the book needed editing. Badly. Kean's writing is usually OK, but sometimes forced, folksy, and pedantic. I could go from enjoyment to annoyance to wanting to throw it across the room and/or get out my red pen. -1 star because there is no comprehensive bibliography, which is a cardinal sin in a book about science, just a short list of books. I have no doubt he did a lot of research, but there should be *some* accountability. Instead, in endnotes, there are more folksy stories (that require flipping to the back of the book to read, and which were usually only tangential and not particularly interesting footnotes to the main story, meaning the flow was disrupted for no good reason). In any case: interesting topic, good stories, only OK execution, and little authorial accountability. I really can't see myself reading anything Kean writes in the future unless he cites his sources and drops the folksy facade.

benjamin-biswas

Wanted to like this but I personally found the style kind of pretentious and self-conscious, so I could never get through it.

benjamin-biswas

I'd just like you guys to know that this is a reread, so I don't exactly have that big urge to rave about it to everyone anymore ( though I did the first time I read it), but I figured since I've been mentioning it around the blog so much lately I may as well write a review. That being said, I may be making references to the strong way I felt about the book the first time I actually read it. Unwind is one of those books that will linger for quite some time. It's just so amazing in so many different ways, that even after having read it a few times, I am simply amazed by how wonderful it is. The story begins with a problem. It's not necessarily the type of problem you can fix either, because the problem is this: Connor, Risa, and Lev are all more or less about to die, and there's they can do to nothing to stop it. Of course, they don't actually die (at least not in the beginning!!), because then there wouldn't be a story to tell, would there? Unwind was so much more than I had expected. That being said, I don't know exactly what I had expected going into the book, but it wasn't the depth and intensity I found. The characters were wonderful, all real and relate-able, and although the story is written in third person, I also loved the writing. It's a book I would definitely recommend, especially to fans of dystopian's, sci-fi's, and anyone looking for a slightly creepy read.

benjamin-biswas

Wow, loved it. I don't know what I can say that wouldn't be a spoiler. Ms. Carriger has tied up loose ends and given even the secondary characters closure. Of course it helped that it mixed in some Egyptology, another of my favourite genres. I can't wait until her new series set in the same universe are out.