kzhabinskiy

Konstantin Zhabinskiy Zhabinskiy itibaren 8225 Schönau bei Pöllau, Avusturya itibaren 8225 Schönau bei Pöllau, Avusturya

Okuyucu Konstantin Zhabinskiy Zhabinskiy itibaren 8225 Schönau bei Pöllau, Avusturya

Konstantin Zhabinskiy Zhabinskiy itibaren 8225 Schönau bei Pöllau, Avusturya

kzhabinskiy

Bu beklediğimden çok farklı olmasına rağmen Oz, dönüş zevk. Wicked kadar büyüleyici değil, kendi hikayesi. Bazen biraz yavaş görünüyordu ve aniden sona erdi. Erkekler Arasında Bir Aslan okuyacağım ve nihayetinde, cevap almaktan başka, başka bir sebepten ötürü, Oz dışında.

kzhabinskiy

Translating...

kzhabinskiy

Bu modern Suudi Arabistan'da yaşama büyüleyici bir bakıştı. Kitap kulübümüz için mükemmel bir seçimdi - canlı tartışma için yapılan tüm kültürel uyumsuzluklar. Kitap kulübü konsensüsü, bunun çok keyifli bir okuma olduğu yönündeydi.

kzhabinskiy

Bu kitabın ilginç bir önermesi olduğunu düşünüyorum, ancak dilbilgisi ve yazım hataları çok korkunç! Gemma muhtemelen genç bir yetişkin kitabında karşılaştığım en rahatsız edici ve çocukça kahramanlardan biridir. On sekiz yaşında olması gerektiğine inanamıyorum, daha on üç-on dört yaşında gibi geliyor. Bütün bir şey hissedememek, evet, anlıyoruz. Tekrar tekrar tekrarlamanıza gerek yoktur. Ayrıca, çok fazla olmayan bir kitap için de çok uzundu. İçeri girmenin üçte biri kadar zorlanıyordum, geri kalanı sadece bunun üstesinden gelmek ve sonunda ne olduğunu görmek için yağmaladım. Son olarak, bir kişi kaç kere 'heck' kelimesini kullanabilir ?!

kzhabinskiy

fascinated... insightful memoir of Mary-Ann Kirkby, as she recounts the journey from Hutterian colony life to the society of today. i couldn't lay it aside. heart strings played throughout the lives she describes. struggles of life, love and losses. great faith, forgiveness and generously sprinkled with humour. poignant... thank you, Mary-Ann, for so beautifully sharing your life with us. award winning~ " ... Honest, clear, direct, it opens the door on what has been for so many of us a completely closed world." -- Winnipeg Free Press 2007 BEST NON-FICTION " A superb memoir... This has the makings of a prairie classic." -- Award Jury from www.polkadotpress.ca/

kzhabinskiy

Strikes me as a feminine Kerouac through her delivery and the sensibility. I also liked the backdrop of the story feeling some attachement to the drier South Western states.

kzhabinskiy

A bit slow at times, but interesting. I wanted to read the sequel, but it's not out until the end of the month.

kzhabinskiy

I'll be rating the books individually, but this review applies to the trilogy as a whole, so: ****** SPOILERS AHEAD ****** Book 1, The Hunger Games is superb, fast-paced, tense and dramatic! I won't delve into the plot at all, except to say that the book is so well written, it could be a stand-alone novel. In fact, I wish it wasn't a trilogy.. I wish I had stopped at just this one. Anyway, so we are introduced here to Katniss as a young, hard working girl who not only manages to put food on the table for her mother and sister, but also finds small pleasures in her hunting trips with friend Gale. Her love for her father who died in a mine blast is so well sketched, and so is her frustration with a mother who was unable to pick up the reins following his death. But Katniss loves her younger sister Prim above all others. So when she volunteers to take Prim's place at The Hunger Games, it comes as no surprise to us; but Katniss is the one surprised at the show of support she receives for this act. And so, as the book proceeds, we witness more and more such telling instances of Katniss' breathtaking naivety - with regard to everything!: the Games, the Capitol, her family, friend, and of course, the quiet and intelligent Peeta. She is mule-headed all throughout with one (selfish, understandably so) goal - to get out of the Games alive and go back home. Of course, being as simple-minded as she is, she thinks everything's going to be the same on her return. If only that were the case.... I wouldn't have had the misfortune of reading the next two books then. Book 2, Catching Fire has the first half describing Katniss' life in the aftermath of having won and subverted (I'll admit it was clever, but they made too much out it!) The Hunger Games. And here, it begins to dawn on Katniss that just maybe, not everything is ok at Capitol and the Districts. So, what does a naive girl who's never thought anything beyond setting food on the family table do? She decides to run. And when she's confronted with the ridiculousness of her decision to flee, what's her next decision? To rebel. Err... How? She has no clue. So we're put through this frustrating "growth" (so untrue!) of Katniss for nearly half of the book - apart from of course putting us through the mind-numbing indecision of Katniss with regard to Peeta and Gale. And when she's thrown into the Games again, what does she do? She sets herself up as a martyr and begins a "Save Peeta" campaign - which she doesn't follow through. Catching Fire is frustrating, boring and I only skimmed through the book. Even the Game in this book didn't seem half as thrilling despite all its stage-effects of lightning, fog, rain, scary monsters (err.. monkeys), and what not. But we do learn one thing - there is a rebel faction!! And they want Katniss to be its poster-girl! So Book 3, Mockingjay throws us straight amidst a war-like underground battlement facility of the Rebels where everyone's considered a soldier at war, and the sole purpose of whose existence is to destroy the Capitol. And so we see dear Katniss faced with yet another indecision - and this is a famous one for YA dystopian novels - whether to support the Rebellion or not. Funnily enough, in many YA dystopian novels, while the forces in power are simply described as faceless, ideology-less creatures (who are somehow fascist nonetheless with the hows and the whys oh so conveniently done away with), the Rebels are often painted in starkly identifiable Soviet Russia or Communist China-like descriptions - who predictably turn out to be as fascist as the powers-that-be. So, in almost comic fashion, we see Katniss being run through situation after situation where she's desperately trying to act out the Mockingjay without having a clue as to what it, or the war, entails. Even if the book could convince me that Katniss in fact "grew up", I would gladly burn it for the sheer nonsense that it was! The aspiration to write apocalyptic situations is understandable, but it seems as though Ms. Collins (and a host of other YA writers) is able to handle only reality-show like situations. The war descriptions seemed straight out of some premature video game; and the romance was hurried and wasted to the last paragraph of the last chapter and the epilogue. Trilogies put far more pressure on writers than do series. The advantage of writing a series with no pre-determined conclusion is that the books can often stand on their own. Catching Fire and Mockingjay neither do that, nor are they good examples of writing. What a disappointing trilogy!