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Brendon De Gee De Gee itibaren Ban Mai, Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District, Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya, Tayland itibaren Ban Mai, Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District, Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya, Tayland

Okuyucu Brendon De Gee De Gee itibaren Ban Mai, Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District, Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya, Tayland

Brendon De Gee De Gee itibaren Ban Mai, Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya District, Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya, Tayland

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When I think about this book, I think I really liked it. The story of a golden boy whose adult life is crushed after his protester daughter bombs the local post office is certainly compelling. However, and I felt this while reading The Plot Against America, too, there's something about Roth's style that gets to me. At times it feels clipped, while at others I wish he'd hurry up and get to the point already. Argh I can't decide.

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When I was a kid, I went through a phase where all I read were biographies of famous women. Amelia Earhart, Hellen Keller, Molly Pitcher and of course Louisa May Alcott and Clara Barton. I have very strong and fond memories of reading Invincible Louisa in the library of my elementary school. So the thought of reading the Glory Cloak, with its historical fiction take on not one but two of my childhood heros, certainly appealed to me. For the most part, I think the book works. Adding the fictional character of Susan allowed the author to connect Alcott and Barton and to go back and forth between them as the story progressed. Using Alcott's novels, letters and family diaries, the author did a fairly decent job in recreating some points in Louisa's life... particularly the Hospital Sketches era where she served as a nurse in the Civil War. However, I think the author tried too hard to explain why Alcott never married. She depicts Louisa as depressed and emotionally stunted both by a pathological need to provide for the family (since her father was ill equipped to do so) and by her father's disapproval and inability to love her. As a result, in O'Brien's view, Louisa chases after emotionally unavailable men (like Thoreau) and is unable to pursue a man who is willing and able to return her love. The love triangle and resulting betrayal that came out of all this was, in my opinion way too melodramatic and what's more it was just plain uncessary. But I have decided to consider it a homage to Alcott's sensational "pot-boilers" and move on. Clara Barton is treated better in the story and I enjoyed reading about her post-war activities since most of what I knew about her focused on her nursing and the founding of the American Red Cross than her efforts to locate the missing and name the dead. All in all, The Glory Cloak was a good book.... a grown up version of the idealized biographies that I read as a girl. I have my doubts as to whether Louisa, herself, would have liked it and there are aspects that I have decided to take with a grain of salt but it was definitely worth my time.