gauravgopinath

Gaurav Gopinath Gopinath itibaren Zhizdra, Kaluga Oblast, Rusya itibaren Zhizdra, Kaluga Oblast, Rusya

Okuyucu Gaurav Gopinath Gopinath itibaren Zhizdra, Kaluga Oblast, Rusya

Gaurav Gopinath Gopinath itibaren Zhizdra, Kaluga Oblast, Rusya

gauravgopinath

salinger meets post-modern japanese existentialist angst

gauravgopinath

Por suerte, aunque he visto la película, no recuerdo demasiado de ella. Escrito maravillosamente, sin embargo, creo que la vida de Stevens no me apasiona tanto como a él, aunque como ya me había comentado mucha gente, Ishiguro escribe de una manera exquisita. En la valoración del personaje central me debato entre un rechazo y una atracción constante, y eso ha hecho que me interesara la evolución de la historia, a ver dónde y cómo terminaba Stevens sus días... de otra manera, sólo las tradiciones de las grandes mansiones, aunque ligadas a la historia británica, quizá no me hubieran interesado tanto.

gauravgopinath

So, I'm a big fan of Wally Lamb's book, "I Know This Much is True", and when I read somewhere that he volunteered twice a month to teach writing at a women's prison in Connecticut and a book of their essays had been published, I was definitely curious. And a little jealous. I would LOVE to be given an opportunity to practice writing with the help of an author such as Lamb! Not that I'm willing to get myself locked up to do so, but you get the drift. :) Anyway, the result of his work with these women is a pretty powerful book. None of the essays speak in great detail about the crimes that landed them in jail, but instead offer a quick glimpse into the worlds that led up to their imprisonment whether it be a story from childhood, adolescence, or adulthood. It is clear these women use writing as a way to process things, people, and events in their lives that helped them become who they are. And I use the word "helped" with tongue-in-cheek because what these women are processing are mostly traumatic circumstances such as poverty, physical and/or sexual abuse, neglect, etc. What I think I like most about the book as a whole is that not one single author used the terrible things they'd been through to make excuses for or justify their reasons for being in jail. I mean, wow. That, to me, speaks volumes about a person's ability to be introspective enough to gain peace with their lives. All in all, I'd recommend this book not just for the writing itself (and it's really good writing, by the way), but for the content and lessons each of the essays have for us to learn about worlds some of us are lucky enough never to experience, and about jail itself. In his introduction Wally Lamb tells a story about an accquaintance who upon hearing of his volunteer work at the prison made her narrow-mindedness and lack of compassion for the inmates very well known and he said it is for her that he put the book together. If anyone can read this book and still write any of these women off as useless in this world, that reader needs his/her heart checked to make sure it's still actually beating.

gauravgopinath

Very different than I expected. I'm not sure how much I liked Peter pan.. kind of a brat...