swagedyyolo

Bob Marely Marely itibaren Predtechensk, Tomskaya oblast', Rusya, 634507 itibaren Predtechensk, Tomskaya oblast', Rusya, 634507

Okuyucu Bob Marely Marely itibaren Predtechensk, Tomskaya oblast', Rusya, 634507

Bob Marely Marely itibaren Predtechensk, Tomskaya oblast', Rusya, 634507

swagedyyolo

I actually read this book with my summer school class and we had to do a sort of like "fish bowl" discussion about it. I had to read it various times and trust me, I never got tired of reading it over and over again. The moment I read it I just loved all the inference that made it really unique and fresh.

swagedyyolo

One would think that horror writers could have quite profound things to say about horror film - about its intertwined evolution with horror writing, about the different tactics necessary for eliciting fear on screen or in print, about the iconography or horror film and how it alters expectations for horror writing...all sorts of things. But, alas, it seems that horror writers, at least the ones whose contributions editor Chris Golden solicited, had very little of any interest to say about horror films. "I watched horror films as a child" read the sum of many of these essays, or, in one case, "Filmmakers keeps making my books to film and doing it badly". Forgive my high expectations, but I really was looking for something a bit more thoughtful.

swagedyyolo

(Hardcover, county library edition) Disappointing. Great concept. Too many holes in the logic. Why were some computer driven robots given so much power while others given none? Am I getting jaded by reading so many other books that really rock? (Sure wish there were more.) To finish up... I felt like I was reading a Marvel comic book. This has the potential for being made into a great scifi movie, though, especially in the hands of Steven Spielberg. Imagine that; a movie better than the book. Usually, as we know, it's the other way around.